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HUMAN 2DH3 Intro to Digital Humanities (C01)

Academic Year: Winter 2019

Term: Winter

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Prof. Mica Jorgenson

Email: jorgenma@mcmaster.ca

Office:

Phone: 905-525-9140 x

Office Hours: Wednesdays, 2:30-4pm Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship (Mills Library, L110)



Course Objectives:

This course introduces students to digital humanities research methods and tools. Students will learn about three primary impulses that drive digital scholarship: analysis, preservation, and resource creation. They will work with existing digital resources, learning to use and assess them effectively; and will also digitize material to create new resources while learning about copyright, intellectual property, and accessibility.

Class time will provide opportunities for in-depth discussion of course readings and hands-on exploration of DH methods and tools.

Students who have taken this course should be able to:

  • Think critically about the role of emerging digital tools and methods within their own lives, the humanities in general, and society at large.
  • Evaluate and apply a set of DH tools and methods and gain experience with experimentation.
  • Understand how to translate small-scale tools and skills to a large-scale DH project.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

All readings are available online via Avenue to Learn or Open Access URL. 


Method of Assessment:

Participation (20%)

Discussion and group work is central to this course. Students are expected to attend class regularly. High participation grades reflect students’ contributions to class discussions and participation in exercises and group-work. Absenteeism, chronic lateness, and non-participation will affect the final grade.

In-Class Exercises with the Daily Twitter (30%)

Throughout the semester, students will complete a series of in-class exercises related to the tools and concepts covered in the course. These will normally be completed and submitted during class time and will usually be collaborative group work. We'll be using a digitized collection from McMaster's archive from the Crombie Family Fonds ("the Daily Twitter") for most of these assignments. 

Due: (**NOTE: WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE RESOURCE LIST, THESE WILL BE COMPLETED IN CLASS AND DO NOT REQUIRE WORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS TIME**):

DH Project Critique: Jan 9 (/20)

Close Reading Report: Jan 23 (/20)

Database Plan: Feb 6 (/20)

Crombie Resource List: Feb 25 (/20)

Collaborative Map: Mar 20 (/20)

Journal (20%)

Students will maintain a weekly journal during the course. Entries should be 200 words minimum and provide personal, thoughtful analysis and reflection on course content (including readings, discussions, and assignments). High quality journals will demonstrate a high level of critical thinking, relate observations to classroom concepts and/or personal experiences (may draw on reflection about other courses as well as daily life) and make conceptual/topic links between entries.

Due:

First half (Jan 7th to Feb 13th entries): Feb 13th (/50)

Second half (Feb 25th to Apr 1st entries): Apr 1st (/50)

Digital Project Plan (30%)

Over the course of the semester, students will design and plan a digital project. The components will be graded separately, and are listed below. Because we will not be actually executing the project, the only limit on its scope is the student’s imagination. Students are encouraged to propose topics of interest to them, and/or which are applicable to their other humanities classes. If you’re stuck, I have a list of potential ideas you might use.

Due: (**NOTE: THERE WILL BE SOME CLASS TIME FOR PARTS OF THE DIGITAL PROJECT, BUT STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO WORK ON MOST PARTS ON THEIR OWN TIME**)

Research Question: Jan 30th (/10)

Cue Card Proposal: Feb 27th (/20)

Final Project Bibliography and Lit Review: Mar 6th (/30)

Final Project Plan Due: Apr 8th (/40)

How to Submit: 

Detailed descriptions of individual assignments will be posted in Avenue to Learn and explained in class. You are encouraged to begin working on assignments immediately. All assignments will be submitted via Avenue to Learn.


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

All assignments are due on the due date provided. Any submission after that date will mean that the assignment is late, and subject to a deduction of 10% per day to a maximum of 30%. No assignments will be accepted later than one week past the deadline.

E-mailed assignments will not be accepted. A technical difficulty (network outages, hardware or software malfunctions, data loss) does not warrant an extension. Please keep this in mind. Plan accordingly and maintain backup copies of work.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

 

Date/Subject

Required Readings & Description of Class

WEEK 1: WHAT IS/ARE DIGITAL HUMANITIES?

 

MON JAN 7: INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

 

Course Syllabus

WED JAN 9: WHAT IS/ARE THE DIGITAL HUMANITIES?

 

Ian Bogost, “Beyond the Elbow-Patched Playground.” Online. http://bogost.com/blog/beyond_the_elbow-patched_playg_1/

 

Spiro, Lisa. (2011 Oct 14) Getting Started in the Digital Humanities. Online. https://digitalscholarship.wordpress.com/2011/10/14/getting-started-in-the-digital-humanities/

 

Explore: Around DH http://www.arounddh.org/

 

WEEK 2: THE ARCHIVE AND DIGITIZATION

 

MON JAN 14: THE ARCHIVE & DIGITIZATION

 

Reply All: The Picture Taker: https://www.gimletmedia.com/reply-all/71-the-picture-taker#episode-player

 

Langdon Winner, “Do Artifacts Have Politics?” Daedalus 109 (Winter, 1980). PDF. https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/20024652.pdf?refreqid=excelsior%3A894a380da418b387a1543b78f64fcc5d

 

WED JAN 16: THE ARCHIVE AND DIGITIZATION (PRACTICAL)

 

 

In-class: Visit to the William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections (Mills Library).

 

Introduction to the Crombie Family Material and the Daily Twitter

 

WEEK 3: GETTING DOWN WITH DATA

 

MON JAN 21: WHAT IS DATA?

 

Begin: Assigned sections from the Daily Twitter (PDF available on A2L). 

 

Kitchin, Rob. (2014). Conceptualizing Data. The Data Revolution: Big, Data, Open Data, Data Infrastructures & Their Consequences. (pp.1-26). London: Sage. E-book through library (sign in first):
HTTP://libaccess.mcmaster.ca/login?url=http://methods.sagepub.com/book/the-data-revolution

 

           

WED JAN 23: GETTING DOWN WITH DATA (PRACTICAL)

 

Finish Assigned sections from the Daily Twitter (PDF available on Avenue to Learn). 

 

Explore the Daily Twitter and Creating Research Questions (practical).

 

WEEK 4: TEXT ANALYSIS

 

MON JAN 28: THE LONG HISTORY OF THE INTERNET

 

Ian Milligan, “The Problem of History in the Age of Abundance” 16 December 2016, The Chronicle of Higher Education. https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Problem-of-History-in-the/238600

 

James Dewar, “The Information Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead,” https://www.rand.org/pubs/papers/P8014/index2.html

 

Skim: Julien Mailland, “Building Internet Policy on History: Lessons of the Forgotten 1981 Network Neutrality Debate,” Digital Technology, Culture, and Society 2(1-2): https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24701475.2018.1450702

 

Explore:

Tim Berner Lee’s Proposal: https://www.w3.org/History/1989/proposal.html

The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine: https://archive.org/web/

 

 

WED JAN 30: TEXT ANALYSIS (Practical)

 

Milligan and Weingart “Basic Text Mining: Word Clouds, their Limitations, and Moving Beyond Them.” http://www.themacroscope.org/?page_id=362

 

Using Voyant Tools to understand the Daily Twitter

 

WEEK 5: PRIVACY AND DATA GOVERNANCE

 

MON FEB 4: PRIVACY, ADVERTISING, AND DATA GOVERNANCE

 

Reply All, Is Facebook Spying on You? https://www.gimletmedia.com/reply-all/109-facebook-spying#episode-player

 

Note to Self: Alexa, is Amazon Taking over the World? https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/amazon-antitrust-monopoly

 

Ramsay, Stephen. (2004). Databases. In Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens and John Unsworth (Eds.), A Companion to Digital Humanities (pp. 177-197). London: Blackwell. Online: http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/view?docId=blackwell/9781405103213/9781405103213.xml&chunk.id=ss1-3-3&toc.depth=1&toc.id=ss1-3-3&brand=default

 

 

WED FEB 6: DATABASE COLLABORATION

 

Working together, we’ll decide on a plan for a Daily Twitter database. Then we’ll collaborate to enter as much data as possible.

 

WEEK 6: DIGITAL HYGEINE AND DATABASE CREATION

 

MON FEB 11: ETHICS AND POLICY

Reply All: In the Desert: https://www.gimletmedia.com/reply-all/53-in-the-desert#episode-player

 

Note to Self: Privacy, Data Survivalism and a New Tech Ethics https.//www.wnycstudios.org/story/bonus-privacy-paradox

 

WED FEB 13: DATA ENTRY

 

Today we’re turning Daily Twitter data into computer-readable spread-sheet form for later analysis. 

 

Optional Reading Break Activity: Note to Self “The Privacy Paradox” https://project.wnyc.org/privacy-paradox/

 

FEBRUARY 18-24:

------------------- READING WEEK!!-----------------------

 

WEEK 7: COMMUNITY DATA

 

MON FEB 25: FINDING RESOURCES

 

 

Instead of reading this week, use the library website (and any other community resources you can think of) to find as many resources on the Crombie family, their home, or their context. Bring your list to class.

 

WED FEB 27: CUE CARD PROPOSAL

 

A class devoted to producing our digital project proposal for the final assignment.

 

WEEK 8: DATA CLEANING AND VISUALIZATION

 

MON MAR 4: DATA CLEANING

 

Tufte, Edward. (1983). Aesthetics and Technique in Data Graphical Design. In, The Visual Display of Quantitative Information (2nd ed). (pp. 177-190). Connecticut: Graphics Press. PDF

 

D’Ignazio, Catherine. (2015 Dec 20). What Would Feminist Data Visualization Look Like? MIT Centre for Civic Media. Online. https://civic.mit.edu/feminist-data-visualization

 

Expore: Dear Data: http://www.dear-data.com/theproject

 

WED MAR 6: VISUALIZATION

 

Using Excel and Google Fusion Tables we’ll make some basic visualizations of our Daily Twitter database.

 

WEEK 9: POLITICS OF MAPPING

 

MON MAR 11: THE POLITICS OF MAPS

 

Jeremy Crampton, Mapping: A Critical Introduction to Cartography and GIS (Blackwell, 2010) Chapter 1: Maps – A perverse Sense of the Unseemly (p. 1-12) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/mcmu/reader.action?ppg=15&docID=477872&tm=1540933906712

 

In Class: Visit to the maps library.

 

WED MAR 13: MAPPING THE DAILY TWITTER

We’ll use geoparsed locations from The Daily Twitter to explore the geography of the Daily Twitter/the Crombie family in various mapping softwares (QGIS, Tableau, Fusion Tables).

 

WEEK 10: OPEN DATA & COPYRIGHT

 

MON MAR 18: OPEN EVERYTHING?

 

OPTIONAL: Reply All, Very Quickly to the Drill: https://www.gimletmedia.com/reply-all/78-very-quickly-to-the-drill#episode-player

 

Radio Motherboard, Copyright Law is a Beautiful Trainwreck: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/d73kyz/copyright-law-is-a-beautiful-trainwreck

OR explore the 5 Useful Articles Archive at https://tinyletter.com/5ua/archive

 

Rob Kitchin. (2013). Four critiques of open data initiatives. The Programmable City. Online: http://progcity.maynoothuniversity.ie/2013/11/four-critiques-of-open-data-initiatives/

 

Read a privacy policy for an app you use. If you’re not sure where to start, try Google’s Privacy Policy: https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en&gl=ZZ

OR explore your privacy policy with Polisis: https://pribot.org/polisis

 

WED MAR 20: THE CROMBIES IN GOOGLE MAPS

We’ll try and forget everything we just learned about google as we add Daily Twitter details to a Google Map.

 

WEEK 11: DIGITAL DISPLAYS

 

MON MAR 25: COPYRIGHT, DISPLAY, AND DIGITAL EXHIBITS

 

Set up and planning for a 2DH3 Research Site.

 

WED Mar 27: CROMBIE RESULTS

 

As a class we’ll work to display our results from our Daily Twitter research on a wordpress site

WEEK 12: PRESENTATIONS & WRAP UP

 

MON APR 1: WRAP UP

 

A class for tying up loose ends, finishing our website, and reflecting on the process of analysing the Daily Twitter - successes and pitfalls. 

WED APRIL 3: PROJECT PRESENTATIONS

 

Final project presentations. Schedule to be determined.

 

WEEK 13: PRESENTATIONS

 

MON APRIL 8: PROJECT PRESENTATIONS

 

Final project presentations. Schedule to be determined.